Employee Highlight: Mike Murtaugh

How did you get interested in advertising/PR and how did you break into the industry and land your first job?

The path I took to wind up in advertising and public relations was unplanned. All through college, I was confident I would follow my passion for sports writing into the job market. Surprisingly, I switched potential career paths at the last possible second towards the agency side. My degree from Butler University was in marketing, and I pivoted toward the business development and PR side once I started working in an agency.

After graduation, I landed my first job with another agency in Indianapolis. A friend of mine from college had started working there and had done well for himself, so when an in-house position became available, I applied as a way to get my foot in the door. Long story short, I sort of fell into the industry, but have been in it ever since.

What are the specializations/most important tools of the trade?

To be successful in an agency, you need to pay attention to detail and possess a willingness to do what you’re asked, when you’re asked to do it. It shows others that you are passionate about the work you do, that you care about it and also that you care about the final product. Working long hours or working on a challenging project will help you prove, to yourself and others, what you’re capable of accomplishing.

What characteristics do you need to be successful in the advertising industry?

In the advertising (and public relations) industry, you need to be confident and flexible. It is important to be self-assured and know you are in the industry for a reason. Know you can handle whatever you encounter and be able to go with the flow when people present you with challenging assignments.

Do you have any interesting hobbies/second jobs/bits of information that make you pop as an individual?

My passion is sports – playing them, watching them. It’s a big part of my life. Aside from sports, I enjoy spending my time with friends, watching movies and listening to music.

When and where do you have your best ideas?

There is not one consistent place where I come up with my best ideas. I will sometimes stew over something for a little while and formulate a strategy before I dive into it. Sometimes an idea will come to me in the middle of the night, and I will get up to jot it down. You never really know when an idea is going to hit you.

What has been the most exciting project/campaign that you’ve worked on at Hirons?

On the account side, I’m most proud of being able to take the first stab at writing copy for the Eskenazi Health website. It was cool to see our team launch the website, in full, during fall of 2016. In terms of business development, I’m most proud of reaching our goal of continuing to grow our federal initiative. Although it took almost a full year in my current position, we finally landed an exciting new federal client, which is a U.S. military initiative.

Why is effective advertising/PR so important for growth and success of organizations?

Advertising is a growing, competitive field. Since companies can now promote their products on various social media platforms, the push to be smart, creative and strategic has never been greater. If you’re not all of the above, you will fall by the wayside.

On the public relations front, a company’s reputation is built entirely on a narrative – what people are saying about you and the context of the conversation. PR complements paid advertising, in that it’s a way for companies to utilize a separate promotional vehicle to spread the word about their company – what it does and why you should be doing business with them.

What’s one important tip you would share with anyone looking to go into the agency world?

My tip to others would be to soak in as much knowledge as possible from the people around you, especially those new to the agency world. In most agencies, especially one our size, you will find a lot of people who have a lot of experience. Make yourself a sponge and soak in as much as you can, as quickly as you can.

What is the most meaningful part of your job?

The most meaningful part of my job is getting the win. Although the process may sometimes be grueling, and there may be a lot of hoops to jump through, checkpoints to achieve and challenges to bypass, none of it matters in the end when you get the win.

Living a Sustainable 2017

By Leigh-Ann Pogue, Executive Assistant 

With the advent of the new year comes resolutions large and small – ranging from physical fitness to economic growth, stronger relationships to overcoming fears. At Hirons, we not only believe in working in a sustainable environment but also living a sustainable lifestyle. If you are still looking for the perfect resolution (and it’s never too late to start), here are five small changes that can make a huge impact on our environment.

  1. Buy and Eat Local

Supermarkets give consumers the advantage of getting fruits and vegetables year-round. However, this uses an enormous amount of resources. Buying local not only decreases the amount of fossil fuel energy used to transport locally out of season produce but also puts money back into your local economy by creating jobs and competition in the marketplace. And while you’re at it, make sure to pick up reusable grocery bags.

  1. Use Alternative Transportation

Bikes are not just for triathlon enthusiasts anymore. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions are caused by the transportation sector. If you live close to work, consider walking or biking during fair-weather months. In winter, consider carpooling with friends, family or co-workers or research your local public transportation options.

  1. Reduce, Reuse and Recycle

Do you have an old college sweatshirt sitting in the back of your closet or a book on your nightstand that you know you’re not going to read? Clothes, as well as other items, that are no longer useful to you can be donated to your local shelter or through organizations such as Goodwill  or The Salvation Army. Also, think about ways to give items around the house, such as bottles, Mason jars and cans, a new life. Just check Pinterest if you need #UpCycle inspiration. Most of all, remember less is more. Practice being a conscious consumer by researching the hidden costs behind purchases and reducing the amount of products you buy with plastic packaging.

  1. Conserve Water

This step is pretty simple: Find ways to reduce the amount of water you use on a daily basis. This is not only good for the environment but also good for your wallet. According to National Geographic, you should opt for showers over baths as baths can take up to 70 gallons of water. Switching out standard shower heads for low-flow models can save up to 15 gallons of water during a 10-minute shower. Other simple ways to conserve water include turning off the faucet when you brush your teeth, fixing leaks, taking quick showers and not running the dishwasher until it is full.

  1. Maintain an Energy Efficient Home

The U.S. Department of Energy recommends conducting a home energy audit to determine how your home uses energy. This will help you determine where energy efficient upgrades are needed – whether it be a new water heater, new furnace filter, more insulation, low-flow toilet or simply a complete switch to LED lightbulbs. Keep in mind that upgrading your home could save 5 percent to 30 percent on your energy bill, which is some serious cash.

I Have a Dream!

By Ana Kotchkoski, Account Manager

Each person shares human dignity with others and therefore all equal rights before the law. That means that no physical or cultural difference can justify any limitations to that equality. In other words, equal rights before the law guarantee the right to be and to think differently.

However, the widespread acceptance of this idea is fairly recent in relation to the thousands of years of human history. Even after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 and the covenants and conventions that ensure its validity today, we still see many situations in which the physical, cultural and ideological interests of some individuals are used to deny the equal rights of others. In all cases, these situations have been the result of the imposition of some kind of power – economic, political or ideological – of one group of people over another. There is also the assumption by those who are denying the rights that the targeted group is somehow “inferior” and less deserving because of it.

Today, in commemorating the life of Martin Luther King Jr., let us remember his lifelong devotion to the struggle of African-Americans for equality. Let us remember the violence that he and many others suffered and the discrimination that many still feel today. And let us recommit ourselves to fight for the dream that cost him his life.

Let the bell of freedom ring as the hands of all the men and women of the world unite fraternally.